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COZY THERMOTHERAPY

COZY THERMOTHERAPY

Disclosure of Bias:  As with all authors, you should know my bias. I love warm. I love to get into a hot mineral spring. I love my far infrared sauna when I’m cold. And I especially love my down comforter at bedtime. Also, I have my doubts about the modern medical wisdom, “There’s no cure for the common cold.” Grandma knew better. Also, yes, we do sell products. This allows us to continue doing research and sending out our newsletters to you and your friends. It also provides our tribe with tools to enhance their human experience. 

ThermoTherapy: We might call it Warmth Therapy; Heat therapy which also feels cozy. It also often means perspiring which means detoxing. We’re talking cozy applications of feel-good heat that warms our bodies up to comfortable temperatures above the normal core body temperature for several minutes to a few hours.  (Think Hot Bath, mineral springs, steam room, Infrared sauna, or wrapping up in a bundle of blankets until you perspire) Does anyone besides your grandmother support the medical therapeutic value of Cozy Thermotherapy? Mice do:

Mice with cancer seek out the hottest environment. If you give a group of mice the choice of five environments ranging in temperature from 22°C (72°F) to 38°C (100°F), most of them will go for the “comfortable” 30°C (86°F) option. Humans are similar. We head to Hawaii or Costa Rica where we can enjoy 30°C (86°F) weather. Mice with cancer, on the other hand, tend to prefer the warmest 38°C (100°F) environment. Humans with cancer are more susceptible to feeling cold in “normal” temperatures, especially after receiving treatment. 1

I became interested in thermotherapy when my brother headed to Germany to receive thermotherapy applied to his prostate to get rid of prostate cancer. It was completely successful and without significant side effects. He now has no problems with his urogenital system.  I became even more interested in thermotherapy when Matthew, our Communications Specialist shared that his friend had been mostly disabled for many years from Lyme disease. His friend plans to spend $60,000 later this year to travel to Germany to receive clinical heat therapy to treat this disease. I looked up the doctor and his method for treating Lyme disease and found that both his method and his claimed success rate sound compelling.2

Lyme disease is a particularly troublesome disease.  The CDC estimates that 300,000 people in the US seek treatment for Lyme disease every year! When a doctor’s proposed antibiotic therapy fails, the condition is renamed “Chronic Lyme disease”. Many, like Matthew’s friend, suffer chronic pain and neurological symptoms, have great difficulty finding effective therapy, going from doctor to doctor without relief. There are an estimated 3 million chronic Lyme sufferers in the US, many of whom suffer chronic pain, numbness, and other symptoms. Many of our customers have reported that the Infratonic is quite helpful in dealing with the pain of Lyme:

Karen Hoxeng of Los Altos, CA reported:  I was literally bedridden and almost out of it with severe pain for two weeks. I’ve only started to surface in the past two days. The Infratonic machine is a miracle for helping relieves severe pain. I don’t know what I have done without it both during this extremely painful bout of a sciatica-like condition, and previously for months on end with the severe and debilitating pain of Lyme disease.

Also, Regina Flesher reported:  I have been unable to walk for 2 years, due to problems that started with Lyme disease I caught 2 years ago. For some reason it attacked my right leg. My chiropractor Dr. Seubold offered to try the Infratonic chi machine on the leg; what a miracle. Even he was amazed at how much of the swelling was reduced after 20 minutes of use. I came to your website to buy one to have in my home and will tell everyone I meet what a fantastic device you have. Thanks so much!!”

Because of these reports Matthew wanted to research the Infratonic with Lyme. He sent his friend an Infratonic to see if it would help.

Now it gets Personal:  I was listening to all this activity in the office and it got me to thinking. Last summer I went for a hike here in Reno, Nevada. A few days later I noticed I had some itching around my belt. As I looked, I found 3 little 3/8” bruises along the belt line that itched from time to time.  I found that the Infratonic relieved the discomfort for a few days, but it had kept coming back, the symptoms didn’t go away!!!! A few days after my hike I had read an announcement from the Sierra Club that Ticks with Lyme disease had been identified right along the trail I had hiked. I have been wondered for months whether I had contracted Lyme disease. The symptoms seemed to stay around my belt and not spread, perhaps as a result of the Infratonic use.

I studied the proposed protocol in Germany which involved heating the whole body up to about 42°C (107°F) for two hours, wondering if it would really work.  It was then that a friend took me to Carson Hot Springs, about 20 minutes from my home. As it turns out, they have private natural spring tubs to rent for 2 hours, and we can choose the exact, thermostatically controlled water temperature.  Most people chose 104°F but they also offered 107°F pools.  I went back a week later with a friend who promised to rescue me if I lost consciousness or something. (despite my often-daring writing style, I am really a very cautious investigator.  I want my experiments to be safely controlled.) As it turns out, sitting in the 107F water was comfortable for me. When I got out, I was a little dizzy, but that’s normal because the warmth dilates blood vessels, and when you get out gravity pulls most of your blood down into your toes, leaving your brain a little empty.  The next week was not so comfortable.  I was detoxing. The itching gradually declined over the week with my nightly application of the Infratonic, and after a week, disappeared entirely. I believe the hot water therapy provided a dramatic success once the dead toxins were eliminated. I also like the inherent safety in the fact that no part of the body can exceed 42°C (107°F) when we’re in a 107°F pool of water. The heating pads often used by doctors need to be well above 107°F to induce 107°F so there can be hot spots and tissue damage if the medical version is not carefully supervised.

I planned to go back this week for another treatment, in the midst of the corona virus epidemic in 2020, but the Governor of Nevada just ordered all “nonessential businesses” to close. Hospitals which offer antibiotics for Lyme but don’t offer Thermo Therapy are all open, but Carson Hot Springs, my medical option of choice, was shut down as non-essential. I suddenly believe that natural hot springs are very essential medical businesses. By the way, I have also declared CHI Institute to be an essential business, though most of our employees are working from home until the end of flu season. I will head back for another 107°F hot tub experience as soon as the Governor of Nevada enables Carson Hot Springs to reopen.

In case you are one of the approximately 5 million or so people looking for alternative approaches to Lyme disease, I like Hot Springs, but would caution you that, with years of chronic infection, the body is often filled with accumulated toxins, so start slowly and do extensive metabolic cleansing all the way along.  Also, play it safe. Everybody is different. Consult your doctor or advisor. I read similar advice from reviewers of FIR saunas on Amazon, some priced as low as $150. Start slowly and work up. Also, the claim from Germany is that antibiotics are vastly more effective when synergistically combined with raising the body temperature 107°F. claim in the article is that heating alone kills 99% of the bacteria and combining it with the antibiotics it was closer to 100%. I don’t know about this because I never tried the antibiotics, though Matthew’s friend feels they have been of great help to reduce the downsides.

Back to the Big Picture of Cozy Thermo Therapy: A surprising number of medical organizations support forms of thermotherapy provided it is combined with their form of often-expensive therapy. They find it is effective for all sorts of chronic illnesses. Here are some examples:

The National Cancer Institutes says: “Hyperthermia is almost always used with other forms of cancer therapy, such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy.”  They discuss many forms including “Whole-body hyperthermia which is used to treat metastatic cancer that has spread throughout the body. This can be accomplished by several techniques that raise the body temperature to 107-108°F, including the use of thermal chambers (similar to large incubators) or hot water blankets.” They also evaluate safety: “Does hyperthermia have any complications or side effects? Most normal tissues are not damaged during hyperthermia if the temperature remains under 111°F. However, due to regional differences in tissue characteristics, higher temperatures may occur in various spots. This can result in burns, blisters, discomfort, or pain. Perfusion techniques can cause tissue swelling, blood clots, bleeding, and other damage to the normal tissues in the perfused area; however, most of these side effects are temporary. Whole-body hyperthermia can cause more serious side effects, including cardiac and vascular disorders, but these effects are uncommon. Diarrhea nausea, and vomiting are commonly observed after whole-body hyperthermia.”3

Another researcher reports that Sauna therapy has been used for hundreds of years in the Scandinavian region as a standard health activity. Studies document the effectiveness of sauna therapy for persons with hypertension, congestive heart failure, and for post-myocardial infarction care. Some individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic fatigue, chronic pain, or addictions also find benefit. Existing evidence supports the use of saunas as a component of depuration (purification or cleansing) protocols for environmentally-induced illness. While far-infrared saunas have been used in many cardiovascular studies, all studies applying sauna for depuration have utilized saunas with radiant heating units. Overall, regular sauna therapy (either radiant heat or far-infrared units) appears to be safe and offers multiple health benefits to regular users. One potential area of concern is sauna use in early pregnancy because of evidence suggesting that hyperthermia might be teratogenic.”4

Here’s what controlled laboratory research shows us about the measurable value of ThermoTherapy in cases of sepsis, a leading cause of hospital deaths:In a controlled study, sepsis was induced in rats and half (the experimental group) were heated, (which we might call thermotherapy). Septic, heated animals showed a marked decrease in 7-day mortality rate (21%) compared with septic unheated animals (69%) and showed less lung and liver damage than the unheated group.”5

This review shows benefits of extensive perspiration from ThermoTherapy: “Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Sweat: A Systematic Review. Sweating offers potential and deserves consideration, to assist with removal of toxic elements from the body. As toxic elements are implicated in many serious chronic conditions, research is needed in patients with select conditions to evaluate the body burden and to test the efficacy of source removal, dietary choices and supplements, interventions that induce sweating, and treatments with drugs, all to enhance excretion of toxic elements with the goal of clinical improvement. There is a clear need for robust trials, appropriately sized to assess clinical outcomes, from which therapeutic protocols can be derived. Both biochemical and clinical outcomes should be examined in order to develop and monitor clinical interventions that are both safe and effective.“6

Diabetes: “Heat therapy, such as sauna and hot tub, has become an increasingly regular therapeutical practice around the world since several studies have shown benefits of heat therapy in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. The use of heat therapy in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus revealed a striking reduction of 1% unit in the glycated hemoglobin, suggesting this therapy for the treatment of diabetes. Herein, we shall discuss the use of heat therapy and the mechanisms involved, and suggest a provisional guide for the use of heat therapy in obesity and diabetes. Recent findings: Human studies indicate that heat therapy reduces fasting glycemia, glycated hemoglobin, body weight, and adiposity. Animal studies have indicated that nitric oxide and the increase in heat shock protein 70 expression is involved in the improvements induced by heat therapy on insulin sensitivity, adiposity, inflammation, and vasomotricity. Summary: Heat therapy is a promising and inexpensive tool for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. We proposed that transient increments in nitric oxide and heat shock protein 70 levels may explain the benefits of heat therapy. We suggest that heat therapy (sauna: 80-100°C; hot tub: at 40°C) for 15 min, three times a week, for 3 months, is a safe method to test its efficiency.”7

Cardiac Care: This experimental study of 103 subjects shows acute effects of sauna exposure on body physiology, thermodynamics and cardiovascular function:

“Frequent sauna bathing is associated with a reduced risk of fatal cardiovascular and all-cause mortality events.

Increased sweating during sauna bathing is accompanied by increase in circulation and body temperature.

Passive heat therapy may improve vascular function.

Sauna bathing improved arterial compliance and lowered systemic blood pressure.

Sauna bathing is a safe and recommendable health activity in a population with cardiovascular risk factors”.8

Summary:  As you can see, research shows that the medical world embraces ThermoTherapy, at least from a research perspective. It is easy for us to enjoy outside of the medical arena, because it appears to be so effective at reducing symptoms of chronic illness. It may cut into the bottom line of the medical/pharmaceutical system, don’t expect your doctor to recommend it instead of drugs and surgery. And as far as I am concerned, it is the closest I have found to a cure for the common cold.

 

Engage your Tribe, share your questions, thoughts and ideas in the comment section below!

 

Sources:

1https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3864348/

2 https://www.prohealth.com/library/how-i-discovered-hyperthermia-for-lyme-disease-and-why-it-works-41295

3 https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/types/surgery/hyperthermia-fact-sheet#r1

4 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21951023/

5https://journals.lww.com/ccmjournal/Abstract/1994/06000/Induction_of_the_heat_shock_response_reduces.7.aspx

6 Hindawi Publishing Corporation, Journal of Environmental and Public Health Volume 2012, Article ID 184745, 10 pages doi:10.1155/2012/184745

7 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26049635

8 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41371-017-0008-z

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